Skip to content
Skater shapes

NEW! RUM Compare dashboard

Exploring real user (RUM) data can be a hugely enlightening process. It uncovers things about your users and their behavior that you never might have suspected. That said, it's not uncommon to spend precious time peeling back the layers of the onion, only to find false positives or uncertainty in all that data.

At SpeedCurve, we believe a big part of our job is making your job easier. This was a major driver behind the Synthetic Compare dashboard we released last year, which so many of you given us great feedback on.

As you may have guessed, since then we've been hard at work coming up with the right way to explore and compare your RUM datasets using a similar design pattern. Today, we are thrilled to announce your new RUM Compare dashboard!

With your RUM Compare dashboard, you can easily generate side-by-side comparisons for any two cohorts of data. Some of the many reasons you might want to do this include:

  • Improve Core Web Vitals by identifying the tradeoffs between pages that have different layout and construction
  • Triage a performance regression related to the latest change or deployment to your site by looking at a before/after comparison
  • Explore and compare different out-of-the-box cohorts, such as device types, geographies, page labels, and more
  • Analyze A/B tests or experiments to understand which had the most impact on user behavior, as well as performance 
  • Optimize your funnel by understanding differences between users that convert or bounce from your site and users who don't
  • Evaluate CDN performance by exploring the impact of time-of-day traffic patterns

Let's take a tour...

Continue reading...

Element Timing: One true metric to rule them all?

One of the great things about Google's Core Web Vitals is that they provide a standard way to measure our visitors’ experience. Core Web Vitals can answer questions like:

  • When was the largest element displayed? Largest Contentful Paint (LCP) measures when the largest visual element (image or video) finishes rendering.
  • How much did the content move around as it loads? Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS) measures the visual stability of a page.
  • How responsive was the page to visitors' actions? First Input Delay (FID) measures how quickly a page responds to a user interaction, such as a click/tap or keypress.

Sensible defaults, such as Core Web Vitals, are a good start, but one pitfall of standard measures is that they can miss what’s actually most important.

The (potential) problems with Largest Contentful Paint

Largest Contentful Paint (LCP) makes the assumption that the largest visible element is the most important content from the visitors’ perspective; however, we don’t have a choice about which element it measures. LCP may not be measuring the most appropriate – or even the same – element for each page view.

The LCP element can vary for first-time vs repeat visitors

In the case of a first-time visitor, the largest element might be a consent banner. On subsequent visits to the same page, the largest element might be an image for a product or a photo that illustrates a news story.

The screenshots from What Hifi (a UK audio-visual magazine) illustrate this problem. When the consent banner is shown, then one of its paragraphs is the LCP element. When the consent banner is not shown, an article title becomes the LCP element. In other words,  the LCP timestamp varies depending on which of these two experiences the visitor had!

https://www.whathifi.com with and without the consent banner visibleWhat Hi Fi with and without the consent banner visible

Continue reading...

Ten years of page bloat: What have we learned?

I've been writing about page size and complexity for years. If you've been working in the performance space for a while and you hear me start to talk about page growth, I'd forgive you if you started running away. ;)

But pages keep getting bigger and more complex year over year – and this increasing size and complexity is not fully mitigated by faster devices and networks, or by our hard-working browsers. Clearly we need to keep talking about it. We need to understand how ever-growing pages work against us. And we need to have strategies in place to understand and manage our pages. 

In this post, we'll cover:

  • How big are pages today versus ten years ago?
  • How does page bloat hurt your business?
  • How does page bloat affect other metrics, such as Google's Core Web Vitals?
  • Is it possible to have large pages that deliver a good user experience?
  • What can we do to manage our pages and fight regression?

Continue reading...

SEO and web performance: What to measure and how to optimize

Chances are, you're here because of Google's update to its search algorithm, which affects both desktop and mobile, and which includes Core Web Vitals as a ranking factor. You may also be here because you've heard about the most recent potential candidates for addition to Core Web Vitals, which were just announced at Chrome Dev Summit. 

A few things are clear:

  • Core Web Vitals, as a premise, are here to stay for a while.
  • The metrics that comprise Web Vitals are still evolving.
  • These metrics will (I think) always be in a state of evolution. That's a good thing. We need to do our best to stay up to date – not just with which metrics to track, but also with what they measure and why they're important.

If you're new to Core Web Vitals, this is a Google initiative that was launched in early 2020. Web Vitals is (currently) a set of three metrics – Largest Contentful Paint, First Input Delay, and Cumulative Layout Shift – that are intended to measure the loading, interactivity, and visual stability of a page. 

When Google talks, people listen. I talk with a lot of companies and I can attest that, since Web Vitals were announced, they've shot to the top of many people's list of things to care about. But Google's prioritization of page speed in search ranking isn't new, even for mobile. As far back as 2013, Google announced that pages that load slowly on mobile devices would be penalized in mobile search. 

Keep reading to find out:

  • How much does web performance matter when it comes to SEO?
  • Which performance metrics should you focus on for SEO?
  • What can you do to make your pages faster for SEO purposes?
  • What are some of the common issues that can hurt your Web Vitals?
  • How can you track performance for SEO?

Continue reading...

NEW: Exploring RUM sessions

If you want to understand how people actually experience your site, you need to monitor real users. The data we get from real user monitoring (RUM) is extremely useful when trying to get a grasp on performance. Not only does it serve as the source of truth for your most important budgets and KPIs, it help us understand that performance is a broad distribution that encompasses many different cohorts of users.

While real user monitoring gives us the opportunity for unparalleled insight into user experience, the biggest challenge with RUM data is that there's so much of it. Navigating through all this data has typically been done by peeling back one layer of information at a time, and it often proves difficult to identify the root cause when we see a change:

"What happened here?"
"Did the last release cause a drop in performance?"
"How can I drill down from here to see what's going on?"
"Is the issue confined to a specific region? Browser? Page?"

Today we're excited to release a new capability – your RUM Sessions dashboard – which allows you to drill into a dataset and explore those sessions that occurred within a given span of time.

SpeedCurve Sessions dashboard

Continue reading...

NEW: Lighthouse v8 support!

Google Lighthouse logo

After Google's announcement about Lighthouse 8 this past month, we have updated our test agents. We've gotten a lot of questions about what has changed and the impact on your performance metrics, so here's a summary.

Continue reading...

Web Performance for Product Managers

I love conversations about performance, and I'm fortunate enough to have them a lot. The audience varies. A lot of the time it’s a front-end developer or head of engineering, but more and more I’m finding myself in great conversations with product leaders. As great as these discussions can be, I often walk away feeling like there was a better way to streamline the conversation while still conveying my passion for bringing fellow PMs into the world of webperf. I hope this post can serve that purpose and cover a few of the fundamental areas of web performance that I’ve found to be most useful while honing the craft of product management.

So, whether you are a PM or not, if you're new to performance I've put together a few concepts and guidelines you can refer to in order to ramp up quickly. This post covers:

  • What makes a page slow?
  • How is performance measured?
  • What do the different metrics mean?
  • Understanding percentiles and how to use them
  • How to communicate performance to different stakeholders

Let's get started...

Continue reading...

New! Vitals Dashboard

Getting up to speed on Core Web Vitals seems to be at the top of everyone's to-do list these days. Just in time for the holidays, we are happy to bring you our new Vitals dashboard to help you get a huge jumpstart.

We love to visualize performance data (in case you haven't heard). We love it even more when we can be true to one of our biggest motivations at SpeedCurve: leveraging both RUM and Synthetic data to help you take action on what matters most.

Vitals Dashboard

Continue reading...

First Input Delay: How vital is it?

We’ve been pretty vocal about Core Web Vitals since Google announced this initiative last spring. We love the idea of having a lean, shared set of metrics that we can all rally around – not to mention having a broader conversation about web performance that includes teams throughout an organization.

For many site owners, the increased focus on Core Web Vitals is driven by the fact that Google will be including them as a factor in search ranking in May 2021. Other folks are more interested in distilling the extremely large barrel of performance metrics into an easily digested trinity of guidelines to follow in order to provide a delightful user experience.

We’ve had some time to evaluate and explore these metrics, and we're committed to transparently discussing their pros and cons.

The purpose of this post is to explore First Input Delay (FID). This metric is unique among the three Web Vitals in that it is can only be measured using real user monitoring (RUM), while the other two (Largest Contentful Paint and Cumulative Layout Shift) can be measured using both RUM and synthetic monitoring.

In this post we'll cover:

  • What is FID?
  • What does FID look like across the web?
  • The importance of measuring user interactions
  • How JavaScript affects user behavior
  • Suggestions for how you can look at FID in relation to your other key metrics

Let's dig in!

Continue reading...

Cumulative Layout Shift: What it measures, when it works (and doesn't), and how to use it

Back in May, we shared that SpeedCurve supports Google's Core Web Vitals in both our synthetic monitoring and real user monitoring tools. Two of the Web Vitals – Largest Contentful Paint (LCP) and First Input Delay (FID) – were actually available in SpeedCurve for quite a while prior to the announcement. The newcomer to the scene was Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS), and, not surprisingly, it's the metric that's gotten the most questions.

A few of the questions I've been asked (or asked myself) about Cumulative Layout Shift:

  • What does CLS measure?
  • How is it calculated?
  • What does it mean in terms of actual user experience?
  • Does it correlate to user behaviour or business metrics in any measurable way?
  • What are the (inevitable) gotchas? 
  • Ultimately, how much should we care about CLS?

Six months in, I've had a chance to gather and look at a lot of data, talk with customers, and learn from our friends in the performance community. Here's what I've learned so far.

Continue reading...

Visualizing Layout Shifts

One of the big challenges with Google's new Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS) metric is understanding which elements actually moved on the page, when they moved, and by how much. To help with debugging your CLS scores, we've added a new visualization to SpeedCurve that shows each layout shift and how each individual shift adds up to the final cumulative metric.

CLS Layout Shift

For each layout shift, we show you the filmstrip frame right before and right after the shift. We then draw a red box around the elements that moved, highlighting exactly which elements caused the shift. The Layout Shift Score for each shift also helps you understand the impact of that shift and how it adds to the cumulative score.

Continue reading...

Fast badging for better UX

Is your site fast? Adding to a string of recent announcements including Lighthouse v6 and Core Web Vitals, Google has introduced Fast page labelling in Chrome 85 for Android. If you are curious about what this means for your site and how you can get in front of it, read on!

Continue reading...

The SpeedCurve family grows

I’m really excited to have become the latest member of the SpeedCurve family. I’ve known Mark for 20 years, since he started lecturing in design here in New Zealand. I was one of his first students and we’ve always kept in touch. Our careers have overlapped at various points, it’s the nature of a small country with an even smaller web design industry. I remember attending the Webstock conference where Mark first presented SpeedCurve in the Start-Up Alley competition. He won, netting the prize money and a trip to the USA to present his new startup. We all know how relevant and useful his startup has become and I’m thrilled to have this opportunity to get involved in its development.

Continue reading...

NEW: Lighthouse v6 support!

Google Lighthouse logo

Lighthouse v6 has arrived! The much-anticipated update to Lighthouse is now available to SpeedCurvers as part of our latest test agent updates. Keep reading to find out what this means and how it may affect your performance metrics.

Continue reading...

Tracking Web Vitals for a better user experience

SpeedCurve chart showing FCP, FID and CLS.

Google recently announced an initiative called 'Web Vitals', which focuses on three performance metrics they consider essential for improving the user experience:

  • Largest Contentful Paint (LCP)
  • First Input Delay (FID)
  • Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS)

With the exception of FID, all of these metrics are available in both RUM and Synthetic. FID requires a real user for calculation and therefore is only available in RUM. In place of FID for Synthetic, we recommend tracking JS Long Tasks or Total Blocking Time as an alternative CPU metric.

Continue reading...

New! User Happiness metric, CI plugin, and an inspiring third-party success story

Here at SpeedCurve, the past few months have found us obsessing over how to define and measure user happiness. We've also been scrutinizing JS performance, particularly as it applies to third parties. And as always, we're constantly working to find ways to improve your experience with using our tools. See below for exciting updates on all these fronts.

As always, we love hearing from you, so please send your feedback and suggestions our way!

Continue reading...

Preload scripts

In my previous post I talked about how loading scripts asynchronously reduces the impact of JavaScript resulting in a (much) faster user experience. But even when scripts are loaded async, the browser may still twiddle its thumbs for a second or more waiting for the first script to arrive. This delay can be decreased by using link rel=preload like this:

<link rel="preload" href="main.js" as="script">

Continue reading...

First Input Delay shows how quickly your site responds to user interaction

We're excited to announce the availability of the First Input Delay metric as part of LUX, SpeedCurve's RUM product.

First Input Delay

Continue reading...

Introducing Last Painted Hero

We're excited to announce that we've launched Last Painted Hero as an official metric. Last Painted Hero is a synthetic metric that shows you when the last piece of critical content is painted. Keep reading to learn how Last Painted Hero works, why (and how) we created it, and how it can help you understand how your users perceive the speed of your pages.

The case for smarter heuristics

When choosing the right performance metric, my soapbox for the last few years has been "not every pixel has the same value". In other words, rather than chase dozens of different performance metrics, focus on the metrics that measure what's critical in your page.

Here at SpeedCurve, we think it's good to focus on rendering metrics, because they're a closer approximation to what the user experiences. There are some good rendering metrics out there, like start render and Speed Index, but the downside to these metrics is that they give every pixel the same value. For example, if the background renders and some ads render, that could improve your start render time and Speed Index score, but it might not have a big impact on the user's experience. Instead, it's better to measure the parts of the page that matter the most to users. We call those parts of the page the "hero elements".

Continue reading...

A retailer's guide to web performance

I’m at Shop.org this week, having really interesting conversations with online retailers. What I love about talking with this crowd is that – like me – they're super focused on user-perceived performance. Not surprisingly, we have a lot to talk about.

Making customers happy is the not-so-secret secret to retail success. Delivering a fast, consistent online experience has been proven to measurably increase every metric retailers care about – from conversions and revenue to retention and brand perception. (In fact, there's so much research in this area, I dedicated an entire chapter in my book to it. You can also find a number of great studies on WPO Stats.)

Delivering great, fast online experiences starts with asking two questions:

  • What’s making my pages seem slower for my users?
  • What can I do about it?

The good news is that most of the issues that are making pages slow for your shoppers are right on your pages, which means you have control over them. Here's an overview of the most common performance issues on retail sites, and how you can track them down and fix them. 

Continue reading...

RSS