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Speed Matters

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Fast badging for better UX

Is your site fast? Adding to a string of recent announcements including Lighthouse v6 and Core Web Vitals, Google has introduced Fast page labelling in Chrome 85 for Android. If you are curious about what this means for your site and how you can get in front of it, read on!

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The SpeedCurve familygrows

I’m really excited to have become the latest member of the SpeedCurve family. I’ve known Mark for 20 years, since he started lecturing in design here in New Zealand. I was one of his first students and we’ve always kept in touch. Our careers have overlapped at various points, it’s the nature of a small country with an even smaller web design industry. I remember attending the Webstock conference where Mark first presented SpeedCurve in the Start-Up Alley competition. He won, netting the prize money and a trip to the USA to present his new startup. We all know how relevant and useful his startup has become and I’m thrilled to have this opportunity to get involved in its development.

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NEW: Lighthouse v6 support!

Google Lighthouse logo

Lighthouse v6 has arrived! The much-anticipated update to Lighthouse is now available to SpeedCurvers as part of our latest test agent updates. Keep reading to find out what this means and how it may affect your performance metrics.

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Are your JavaScript long tasks frustrating users?

When it comes to long JavaScript tasks, how long is too long?

The general consensus within the web performance community is that any JS scripting task that takes more than 50ms to execute can affect a user's experience. When the browser's main thread hits max CPU for more than 50ms, a user starts to notice that their clicks are delayed and that scrolling the page has become janky and unresponsive. Batteries drain faster. People rage click or go elsewhere.

No one plans to make a page or web app that sucks the life out of their users' devices, so it's super important to monitor the effect your JS is having. (Yes... I'm looking at you, front-end JS libraries and third-party ads!)

Long tasks waterfall

Our waterfall chart shows every long task over 50ms as a red block.

New JavaScript CPU metrics

We've recently added a bunch of new JavaScript CPU metrics that help you understand if your scripts are blocking the main thread and getting in the way of a super smooth experience for your users:

  • Long Tasks – The total time of all your JS tasks over 50ms added together – from navigation start till the page is fully loaded.
  • Number of Long Tasks – The total number of individual JS long tasks.
  • Longest Task – There's a lot that can hide in the details of long task time. One really long task that frustrates your user is an order of magnitude worse than a bunch of long tasks that are just over the 50ms threshold each. For that reason, we track not only the number of long tasks in a page but also the duration of the longest task in the page. (We've seen individual JS long tasks taking over 1,000ms! That's a whole second where the browser just locked up, sat on its hands, and refused to do anything while a poor user mashed on the keyboard and wiggled the mouse wondering what happened.)

Long tasks chart

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NEW: Compare ALL the things!

One of the huge benefits of tracking web performance over time is the ability to see trends and compare metrics. While you've always had the ability to do this in SpeedCurve, we recently added new functionality that makes it much easier for you to bookmark and compare different Synthetic tests in your test history. 

With the new 'Compare' feature, you can now generate side-by-side comparisons that let you not only spot regressions, but easily identify what caused them:

  • Compare the same page at different points in time
  • Compare two versions of the same page – for example, one with ads and one without
  • Understand which metrics got better or worse
  • Identify which common requests got bigger/smaller or slower/faster
  • Spot any new or unique requests – such as JavaScript and images – and see their impact on performance

Exciting stuff, right? But wait, there's more! Along the way, we've also made it much more intuitive for you to drill down into your detailed Synthetic test results.

Let's take a look...

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Tracking Web Vitals for a better user experience

SpeedCurve chart showing FCP, FID and CLS.

Google recently announced an initiative called 'Web Vitals', which focuses on three performance metrics they consider essential for improving the user experience:

  • Largest Contentful Paint (LCP)
  • First Input Delay (FID)
  • Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS)

With the exception of FID, all of these metrics are available in both LUX (our RUM tool) and Synthetic. FID requires a real user for calculation and therefore is only available in LUX. In place of FID for Synthetic, we recommend tracking JS Long Tasks or Total Blocking Time as an alternative CPU metric.

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User Timing Level 3: Set a value!

The Chrome team has snuck a fundamental change to how user timing marks work into Chrome 78. For many years now, our own Steve Souders has championed user timing, and he has always believed you should be able to set a value for a user timing mark or measure.

With User Timing Level 3, now you can! Level 3 lets you explicit set a startTime whereas previously you could only pass in the name of a mark.

performance.mark("name", {startTime: 1000})

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New! Tracking first- and third-party request groups

Getting visibility into the impact that known third parties have on the user experience has long been a focus in our community. There are some great tools out there – like 3rdParty.io from Nic Jansma and Request Map from Simon Hearne – which give us important insight into the complexity involved in tracking third-party content. 

When we released our re-imagined Third Party Dashboard last year, we were excited to be providing site owners with another great tool for managing the unmanageable. Among other things, we took an approach that included:

  • grouping requests, 
  • exposing Long Tasks attributed to third parties, and 
  • tracking blocking CPU time. 

This provided even more insight into the different ways JavaScript could be causing real headaches for users

We received a lot of feedback from our customers, who loved the new third-party functionality but REALLY wanted to see similar functionality for their "first party" content as well. We heard this message loud and clear, and today we're happy to announce a few changes to our Synthetic monitoring tool that address this need while preserving the functionality you already know and love.

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Introducing Page Speed Benchmarks a new resource for the performance community


Here are some common questions I’m asked when I talk with people about performance:

  • Which metrics should I care about?
  • What types of devices and connections should I test on?
  • Which third parties should I be most concerned about?
  • How fast should I be?
  • What are some good sites I can use for benchmarking?

Today, I’m very excited to announce the release of a new project that helps answer those questions – and more! 

Page Speed Benchmarks is an interactive dashboard that lets you explore and compare web performance data for leading websites across several industries – from retail to media.

With Page Speed Benchmarks, you can do things like:

  • See what the different metrics actually mean in terms of user-perceived performance
  • Compare how the same page renders on fast vs slow devices and connections
  • Understand what makes fast sites fast (and slow sites slow)
  • Get insights into how third parties can perform on different sites
  • Identify sites you can use for your own competitive benchmarking

If you already like tools like the HTTP Archive, I think you'll love how you can use Page Speed Benchmarks to complement the insights you're already getting. Keep reading to find out how we set up these benchmarks, and how you can mine our test data – even if you're not a SpeedCurve user – for your own performance research.

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Six web performance resolutions for the new year

For the past two years, the performance.now() conference has been the most valuable performance event I've attended. So valuable, in fact, that I've made some of the talks the cornerstone of this list of performance resolutions for 2020. I'd love to know how many – if any – of these are on your list. As always, I'd love people's feedback!

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